Luna East Blog Tour: Interview with Chrissie Peria

Luna East Blog Tour Header

It’s still Luna East week! Can we officially set this as the school fair week, or something? :D I’m so excited for this anthology not only because I was there when it started, but mostly because the contributors in this first volume are my #romanceclass classmates. :) They know how to bring in the feels, my friends, trust me on this. :D

Today, I have Chrissie Peria, author of All’s Fair in Blog and War (the first #romanceclass novella released last year) for an interview! Join us as we tour a bit inside the Luna East halls, particularly the cafeteria. ;)

sittinginatreeSitting in a Tree was so cute! And it was the perfect story to open this anthology, I think. :) What was your inspiration in writing this?

Thank you! Sitting in a Tree came from memories of my own high school’s annual fair. Particularly the one from my senior year, when I had to help man the Marriage Booth. No kissing booths for us, Catholic school and all, so the marriage booth was the closest thing. (Yes, marriage was more acceptable than kissing. Go figure.) We had students whispering requests on who they wanted to be paired with. Kilig for all, and we made money. Perfect, right?

Oh, I totally had my moments at our high school’s marriage booth. :D

If you were a student in Luna East Arts Academy, what kind of student would you be? Would you be a jock, or a writer in the paper, or maybe part of the drama club like Samantha?

 A writer for the paper, definitely, because it’s fun to be one. In fact, I have a half-written Luna East story that draws heavily on my own high school days as a campus journalist (eons ago). Maybe it’ll show up in the second anthology? I’ll cross my fingers for that one.

What do you suppose the food in the Luna East cafeteria is like? Do you think it’s something you’d post about in your food blog?

Art is influenced by things we come in contact with, food included, so I’m sure the school administration will provide a diverse array to ensure that the kids are exposed to a variety of influences. I’m betting that the choices are limitless: hearty comfort food, international fare, healthy and ethical food choices, and everything bacon.

And bacon is always blog-worthy.

You had me at bacon. Mmm.

An All’s Fair in Blog and War question: who do you think would fit in the Luna East crowd better – Five or Jesse? If they were students in Luna East, do you think they would have acknowledged each others’ presence there?

Jesse! He’ll fit in perfectly, in that ironic-hipster-I’m-an-artiste (with an e) way. He was probably stalking the fringes of the student body, taking artsy black and white photos for exhibits.

Five, on the other hand, would’ve been a photographer for the school paper. She was probably in the middle of everything, covering everything from sports events, campus assemblies, to what’s being served in the school cafeteria.

I don’t know if they’ll acknowledge each other’s presence just because, but if circumstances threw them together, I’m sure sparks would’ve flown—and that trip to Macau would’ve been totally different.

Do you plan on writing other stories set in Luna East?

Yes! I currently have two pending stories: the one about the campus journalist and one about Sam’s BFF Trisha, the drama queen. Here’s to hoping they get written!

Chrissie PeriaAbout the author:

Chrissie Peria is the author of All’s Fair in Blog and War, a contemporary romance novella featuring feuding travel bloggers in Macau. When not writing, she serves her tiny overlord Miffy and Miffy’s poodle/minion, Cooper. She also enjoys cooking, taking photos and playing with dolls. Chrissie is currently working on a contemporary YA romance featuring books and boys who like books.

Thanks so much, Chrissie! You can read her Luna East story, Sitting in a Tree, in the first volume of the Luna East Arts Academy Anthology, Kids These Days. And you can meet Chrissie, and the rest of the authors, at the #LunaEast launch and #romanceclass anniversary party on February 8, 2014, 6:00pm at the Ayala Museum. That’s this Saturday! See you there, okay? :)

Luna East Book Launch Details

About the book:

The stories from LUNA EAST ARTS ACADEMY are about love. And also, friends, food, kissing, rumors, mean people, insecurities, birthdays, breakups, making up. We set it in an arts academy because we wanted everyone to have a talent, and know it. Because no one is ordinary, if you know them well enough.

Who are you, at LUNA EAST? Are you a popular kid, a wallflower, a drama club diva, a debate whiz? Visit lunaeastacademy.org to read more stories from #LUNAEAST, and submit your own. For readers 16 and up.

Don’t Forget the Soap Blog Tour: Excerpt + Giveaway

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So I’m back, after a stressful two weeks. I promise to catch up on some reviews, but for now, let’s do some promotional blog tour stuff. Today on the blog is a new nonfiction collection of stories from Marie Claire Lim Moore, Don’t Forget the Soap. First off, I love the title. Second, the blurb reminds me a bit of Tweet Sering’s Astigirl, but you know, for moms. And perhaps for daughters, too? Hm, sounds interesting.

About the Book:

Don't Forget the Soap Book CoverAt the center of many good stories – inspiring, entertaining, admittedly corny – is Marie Claire Lim Moore. Ask her about the time she and her family sat down with former Philippine President Corazon Aquino. Or the time she built houses in Mexico alongside former American President Jimmy Carter. Equally engaging are her every day experiences and perspective on life. You will be interested to hear what she thinks is a relationship “deal breaker” or why Christmas should be regulated or why kids shouldn’t say, “I’m bored.”

Don’t Forget the Soap is a collection of anecdotes from different points in Claire’s life: stories from the tight-knit Filipino community in Vancouver mix with memories of her move to New York, experiences at Yale and travels as a young executive. Underlying this narrative is the story of a global citizen who does not want to forget the fundamental values that come along with the “immigrant experience” as she and her husband raise their children in the increasingly glitzy expat bubble of Singapore. Her parents continue to remain a big influence in her life and her mother’s reminders a grounding force. These stories will warm the heart and resonate with people of any culture.

Goodreads | Ebook | Paperback

Excerpt:

My parents were extremely supportive of my pursuing opportunities in different parts of the world (not exactly conducive to settling down), and they didn’t bat an eyelid when my long-term relationship (on path to marriage) ended abruptly just as so many of their friends’ children were walking down the aisle. People would comment, “You must be feeling some pressure from your parents to meet someone.” No, actually, I wasn’t.

Not until the year I turned 30 and met Alex did my mother make any comment in this regard. It was after I finished my assignment in the Philippines and was deciding whether to go back to Brazil, stay on in the Philippines or return to New York. Most of my colleagues in the program continued working abroad (it was considered the faster path to running a business since many of these roles were in emerging markets where one had the opportunity to take on a relatively big job, the equivalent of which would not be available in global headquarters).

“At this point in your life it’s OK to let a ‘friend’ factor into your decision,” she would say. (My parents never used the term “boyfriend.” It could be a “close” friend or a “special” friend but in their minds nothing was official until marriage, so why give anything in between a title.) She continued, “You’ve put a lot of focus on your career, which is great, so now you can balance it by putting some attention on other important things.” After our assignments had finished in Brazil, Alex went back to New York and I went to the Philippines. We left more as friends than anything else but soon found ourselves staying in close touch while on opposite sides of the globe. We spoke at least two times a day despite the time difference, and he even came out to see me in Manila. I decided to take a job back in New York and see where the relationship could go.

About the Author:

marie claire lim moore - author photoMarie Claire Lim Moore is a Filipina-Canadian-American working mother and author of Don’t Forget the Soap. After spending the early part of her childhood in Vancouver, Claire moved to New York City and attended the United Nations International School. She went on to study at Yale, climb the corporate ladder at Citi and travel around the world. She met her husband, Alex, while working in Sao Paulo, Brazil and they married in Manila, Philippines shortly before moving to Singapore. Now Mom to Carlos and Isabel, Claire also manages the Global Client business for Citi in Asia. She enjoys juggling career and family and likes to throw in community and politics for fun by campaigning for US political candidates, fundraising for organizations that advance the role of women in business and promoting foreign direct investment in the Philippines. She is also a guest contributor at Sassy Mama Singapore. She tweets at @MarieClaireLM.

Giveaway!

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ReaderCon 2013 Filipino Friday (3): Book Drop!

Two reasons why this post is delayed: I did it on purpose, and I was just so darned busy again. I’m trying to catch up, really, but ack, I’m sorry if I’ve been neglecting this blog again.

But anyway, better late than never (and just in time for the wrap-up post, I hope! :D)
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Last week’s Filipino Friday is a little more interactive than the previous ones because it was the Pinoy Book Drop week. This idea started last year, after we started the Great Book Swap, which flew well. This year, we thought of putting it in a week (and onwards) so we could drive more activities. It was fun to see how many books were dropped through Twitter and Facebook, and I have a feeling there’s more that we haven’t heard from (like, you know, the ones with private profiles, or those who just didn’t tag us). I think people had fun doing the drops? :)

I have a little confession, though. I had five books to drop…but I only got to drop one. Like I said, I was so darned busy, that I hardly had time to prepare my books. :(

Going Too Far by Jennifer Echols near Digital Walker in Eastwood

Going Too Far by Jennifer Echols near Digital Walker in Eastwood

I feel a little bad, because I should have done more. But the good thing is, even if Book Drop week is over, I can still drop some books. And it’s another long weekend, so I’d have the time, right?

Right.

Oh, and I checked and the book is gone. So yay, whoever you are who got it, I hope you enjoy the book! You can check out the other books dropped through the #pbdrop hashtag. :) Did you find one?

Now because I only have one book for this post, I’m going to answer the second question, too:

Tell us about your most memorable or favorite book hunting experience. Have you ever found a book in a most unexpected place? If you find a dropped book somewhere, what would you do with it? Where do you get your books nowadays? Do you still go to bookstores, or do you buy/order books online?

This is years ago, as in I was still a freshman in college. My mom and I were in Robinson’s Galleria, where I met them after an event. I was browsing around National Bookstore, digging through the books to see if there’s anything there, when I found at the very bottom shelf, two books in a bundle. I pulled it out, just to fix it, when I saw the name of the author: Frank E. Peretti. I think I let out a little squeal when I read the titles: This Present Darkness and Piercing the Darkness.

I found out about This Present Darkness by Frank Peretti from a friend in high school, four years before I found that little treasure in National Bookstore. She lent me the book, and I read it in a few days and I was so amazed at it that I knew I wanted to have a copy of the book for myself. But it was an old book, so I didn’t really think I’d find a copy, until that day. And I was so surprised to find that there was a sequel to it, which made me even more excited because I had no idea there was a sequel.

So I begged my mom to buy it (because I don’t have enough money to do so yet), and I’m glad she did. I read the two books in a week, and I remember being so happy about that find that I emailed several friends about it. I was that happy — and I still have those books on my shelf. I don’t think I will ever let that go, even if the newer editions look nicer. Those two books sealed my love for Frank Peretti and reading longer novels. :D

It’s November tomorrow! That means the ReaderCon is just 9 days away! Don’t forget to pre-register here! The 3rd Filipino ReaderCon: What Do Readers Want? will be on November 9, 2013, 8:00am to 6:00pm at the Rizal Library – Ateneo de Manila University. This event is held in partnership with Rizal Library and National Book Development Board (NBDB), and sponsored by Buqo, Fully Booked, Adarna House, Scholastic, Flipreads, OMF Literature, Hachette, Simon & Schuster and Island Merchants Corporation, with media partner When In Manila. See you there! :)

12 Best Books of 2012

So the 2012 reading year was interesting because I think this is the most I’ve explored different genres. I blame my book club for this, especially with our monthly discussions and their book recommendations. As a result, I didn’t reach the 150-ish book goal. However, I did enjoy exploring these other books that I wouldn’t normally read, so it’s still a pretty good year reading year.

I’ll talk about my reading stats more on another post. First, let’s get the best list out. 12 Best Books for 2012. Let’s get at it, shall we?

  1. Angelfall by Susan EeGruesome, creepy and scary but absolutely fun. I read this book because of all the good reviews I read from my Goodreads friends, and I devoured it in several days. I loved Penryn the kick-ass heroine and the equally bad-ass angels who caused the apocalypse. When is the sequel coming out again? Please make it soon?
    Angelfall by Susan Ee Continue Reading →

What I Read (5): Angus

What I Read

What I Read is a semi-regular guest feature in One More Page allows them to talk about what the title says: what they read. I believe that every reader has a unique reading preference and no reader is exactly the same. What I Read explores that idea, where I let the guests talk about their favorite, genre preferences, pet peeves and everything else in between. :)

I promised a series, right? So here’s another What I Read feature for this month, also from another good book club friend: Angus of Book Rhapsody. :)

Angus and I don’t have much books in common. I remember the first time I heard him talk about the books he read, I said, “Oh, serious books.” Hee. We don’t really talk about the books we read but I thought he was such a funny and vibrant person that I always liked seeing him around our book club activities. Then we started the monthly book discussions and now our shelves have more books in common! :) I remember feeling very proud when he finally read his first YA book (mentioned below) and now he’s one of the people who introduced me to David Mitchell’s works. See, even readers of entirely different genres can be get along! :D

But other than being a “serious” reader (haha you’ll see why I kept that label on him there in his interview), Angus is a very good friend, and I’m really honored to have him here on my blog. :)

Hello, Angus!

Hello, Angus!

In ten words or less, what kind of books do you usually read?

Stylistic, serious, thematic, challenging, unconventional, classic, genre-defying, breath-taking, mind-bending, and…

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